Emotional Stress and Chronic Fatigue

This is an edited excerpt from an email I sent to a reader asking whether the treatment in the Gupta program worked.

After trying a bunch of other treatments and listening to crackpot theories from many quarters, I'm convinced that Ashok Gupta has hit the nail on the head with his amygdala hypothesis. CFS seems to be a self-perpetuating stress response where the body wears itself out by being stuck in permanent fight-or-flight mode. I can now see many warning signs in the years before I got ill which I either ignored or didn't deal with successfully. I had no idea that stress could bring on an illness like this, but now I sure believe it can.

There are several components to the program, but it's principally a thought-stopping technique plus meditation, plus supportive encouragement. I have the attention span of a small gnat (which just contributes to emotional stress... it's all tied in somewhere), and I'm starting to wonder about the thought-stopping technique myself. But there are times when I can almost feel the squirt of a adrenaline into my system when I have a pessimistic or worrying thought; they're not good for you! So part of the problem is me just getting lazy and going "Stop-stop-stop probably doesn't work... why bother doing it anyway". Well maybe it does, maybe it doesn't... it seems worth a try. That's why I set up my blog... so people would remind me to keep at it. Last night I was fantasising about recovering fully and writing a book about my experience to convince other people that this whole thing is stress-related.

At the same time, I'm also looking at other ways to break the adrenaline cycle. The usual cures for stress should work; anything that lessens emotional stress either about being ill or about life in general ought to help. I'm looking at comedy, laughter, and other avenues of self-expression like music. I repress my anger, and I'm doing an acting course to help me get over it. I had an argument at 3am with a sort-of-girlfriend who stayed over, and god it felt good to actually tell her I was pissed off with her even if I was on shaky ground. I judge my emotions waaaaay too harshly, and I'm learning to say "look, this is how I feel... that's just how it is". I'm having a look at psychodrama. I start a 10-day meditation retreat on Wednesday. I'm not going in for any further medical treatments though; I think the continual search for a treatment is just another symptom of the condition.

My skeptical side hears Gupta talking about subconscious thoughts jumping up to consciousness where we have the opportunity to challenge them, and goes "sounds like bullshit to me". But I get a fair bit of email from people who have made massive strides with the Gupta program where nothing else has worked for them. My symptoms were/are relatively mild (no physical pain, utterly devestating as opposed to complete and utter annhialation of anything resembling a normal live) so it's hard for me to say anything has changed dramatically yet. I spent all Saturday and most of Sunday in bed either asleep or exhausted, but I wouldn't class myself as ever having been really bed-ridden. I often overlook the positives and it's early days yet.

I feel much much worse when I don't rest. My throat feels sorer, and my breathing much more laboured; and that's when I find it hardest. And by rest, I mean lie down pretty much whenever I'm tired. Which is all the time.

Many people embark on a graded exercise program, and I'd be interested to hear how they go. I haven't tried a formal program, but every time I've exercised in the past, I've felt truly terrible afterwards. Perhaps I overdid it every time, but my thinking now is that we feel tired because our bodies actually are worn out and need rest. They don't recover properly because we're still in fight-or-flight mode, but the rest is still essential. The general rule is that exercise is good for you... but I doubt it's so great after you've just run a marathon! We're running marathons in our sleep. My impression is that the graded exercise concept is based on the idea that we somehow adjust psychologically to being tired and unfit, and need to be shaken out of it with more activity. I don't buy it. I don't think this is consistent with the amygdala hypothesis, where we actually are physically exhausted and in need of rest. I sometimes wonder whether any proponents of graded exercise have suffered from the condition. But like I say, I have no formal experience of it.

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About Graham

I'm a 41 year old guy, currently recovering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
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